About

srthesisdino_IndexPageI grew up in Ponte Vedra Beach, just outside of Jacksonville, Florida, USA. From the age of six, I would collect fossils of Pleistocene-Holocene age on the beach. While always knowing I would go into paleontology, I had a particular fascination with biology in general (among other sciences). As a result, I wanted to approach paleontology from a more interdisciplinary mindset, and this mindset continues to guide my research today.

I attended The Bolles School in Jacksonville. Starting in high school, I volunteered on paleontological digs in western North America. I now have eight summers of field experience prospecting for and excavating Late Jurassic dinosaurs in Montana, USA, as well as Late Cretaceous dinosaurs with the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada. Many of these summers also included lab experience preparing fossils.

269150_10200723732838669_794486318_n

Montana – Sauropod femur

I attended Princeton University from 2010-2014, earning a bachelors degree in ecology and evolutionary biology. Princeton, once a powerhouse of vertebrate paleontology, closed down their natural history museum almost two decades ago. However, I took this as an opportunity to gain a background in sciences outside of paleontology. In addition to ecology and evolutionary biology,  I took many classes in geosciences as well as a few in molecular biology. One of the best aspects of my time in Princeton was the opportunity to engage in biological and geological field work in Bermuda, Spain, Yellowstone National Park, Utah, New Mexico, Kentucky, the Catskills, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. My undergraduate thesis was entitled “Paleobiology of North American stegosaurs: Evidence for sexual dimorphism”, under the supervision of Dr. James Gould, an ethologist who has carried out much research in sexual selection, among other aspects of animal behavior.

307239_2648317930166_1422144537_n

Yellowstone National Park – Petrified tree trunk

529043_4230448602444_1703402059_n.jpg

Bermuda – Porcupine fish

Upon graduating from Princeton, I traveled to the UK and received a masters in paleobiology at the University of Bristol. My masters thesis was entitled “The taphonomy of keratin in archosaurs”, under the supervision of Dr. Jakob Vinther. This project became the foundation of much of my current research.

I am now working towards my PhD at the University of Bristol. The working title of my thesis is “The evolution of dinosaur integument and feathers: characterization, taphonomy, and biomechanics”, under the supervision of Dr. Vinther as well as secondary supervision from Dr. Emily Rayfield.

1934487_1195253564465_5633808_n

Montana – Stegosaur bonebed

Being at Bristol has allowed me to focus on paleobiology while utilizing a wide variety of analytical techniques under a multidiscipline framework involving paleontology, biology, geology, organic geochemistry, and biomechanics. Although most of my research is based in the lab, I still find time to engage in traditional paleontological field work, including trips to collect fossil samples that I then use in my experiments.

The purpose of this site is to convey my research as it progresses. My interests are wide-ranging, but I am particularly interested in such topics as the biology of non-avian dinosaurs, ornamental structures and sexual selection, and how soft tissues preserve in fossils. Much of my work is highly collaborative, allowing me to work with labs and researchers in many different institutions and with research groups whose backgrounds and interests vary widely.

Links

apple-touch-icon-180x180University of Bristol jc2.jpg_SIA_JPG_background_imageapple-touch-icon-144x144photoGoogle_Scholar_logo_2015logo-1400565790.jpgAAEAAQAAAAAAAAKzAAAAJDYyNGE5MzI3LWM5Y2ItNGQ3OC04M2UyLWE1MDhkZDBmYTQ3ZAblue_white_shadow

CV553996_3711601471590_588088842_n

Utah – Glacial cyclothems